News Literacy Mini-Grants Available

20 Dec

Stony Brook University’s Center for News Literacy has mini grants available for Chicago area schools.

According to the Center, news literacy is the ability to use critical thinking skills to judge the reliability and credibility of news reports and information sources. It enables citizens to become smarter consumers and creators of fact-based information. It helps them develop informed perspectives and the navigational skills to become effective citizens in a digitally connected society. News literacy programs also emphasize the importance of news and information, the value of reliable sources and appreciation of First Amendment freedoms.

The News Literacy Mini-Grant program was established to provide small grants through a streamlined process. This application form is intended to make it easy for you to describe your proposal and partner with the Center for News Literacy and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation’s “Why News Matters” grant-making program to help spread critical thinking skills.

Our goal is speed the adoption of news literacy courses around the country with the idea that “Early Money is Like Yeast”. We want you to help us reach our goal!

About our Mini-Grants:
Applicants and proposals must be located in the Chicagoland area. Ideas can be submitted by 501c3 nonprofit organizations, as well as individuals and businesses partnering with tax-exempt organizations. If you are not a tax exempt organization, be advised that taxes will apply.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: DECEMBER 31, 2013

Applications are available at: News Literacy Mini Grants

Please read through the application carefully. If you have any further questions, please contact Liz Farley at the Center for News Literacy at 631-632-7637 or by email at  elizabeth.farley@stonybrook.edu

For more information about the Robert R. McCormick Foundation and its “Why News Matters” initiative, please visit http://www.mccormickfoundation.org

For more information about the center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University, please visit http://www.centerfornewsliteracy.org

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The need to be Independent….

22 Sep

If we expect news consumer to have quality information, then it has to be Verifiable, Independent and Accountable.

Rick Morrissey of the Chicago Sun-Times hits the nail on the head in this gem.

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/22678847-452/morrissey-as-sis-oklahoma-state-series-shows-sportswriters-cant-be-fans.html

Great Expectations: Too much balance, too much stress?

12 Jun

Fifth  in a series….

Schools participating in the Midwest Journalism Education Initiative’s Collaborative Coverage project funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation have published special reports about the “Great Expectations” facing teens today.McCormick Foundation logo copy

The topic, jointly agreed upon by participating students and advisers, looks at a variety of issues from Expectations on Social Media, to dealing with the expectations of grades.

Today’s featured coverage is an in-depth look at the need to meet “Great Expectations” because of achieving balance without excessive stress.  It’s not easy.  This report is  by student journalists of  The Pacer at Rolling Meadows High School.  It can be found at: The Pacer.

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Great Expectations: Coping with cliques and stereotypes

3 Jun

Fourth  in a series….

Schools participating in the Midwest Journalism Education Initiative’s Collaborative Coverage project funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation have published special reports about the “Great Expectations” facing teens today.McCormick Foundation logo copy

The topic, jointly agreed upon by participating students and advisers, looks at a variety of issues from Expectations on Social Media, to dealing with the expectations of grades.

Today’s featured coverage is an in-depth look at the need to meet “Great Expectations” and the challenges of cliques and stereotyping.  This report is  by student journalists of  The Guardian, at Elk Grove High School.  It can be found at: Elk Grove Guardian.

Visit us soon for more examples of work done by student journalists involved with this project

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Great Expectations: Balancing academic pressures with everyday life

20 May

Third  in a series….

Schools participating in the Midwest Journalism Education Initiative’s Collaborative Coverage project funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation have published special reports about the “Great Expectations” facing teens today.McCormick Foundation logo copy

The topic, jointly agreed upon by participating students and advisers, looks at a variety of issues from Expectations on Social Media, to dealing with the expectations of grades.

Today’s featured coverage is an in-depth look at the need to meet “Great Expectations” because of student schedules and to meet the goals of the school.  This report is  by student journalists of  The Spokesman, at Wheeling High School.  It can be found at:  Wheeling Spokesman

Visit us soon for more examples of work done by student journalists involved with this project.

 

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Great Expectations: Coping with stress and cheating

13 May

McCormick Foundation logo copy

Second  in a series….

Schools participating in the Midwest Journalism Education Initiative’s Collaborative Coverage project funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation have published special reports about “Great Expectations” facing teens today.

The topic, jointly agreed upon by participating students and advisers, looks at a variety of issues from Expectations on Social Media, to dealing with the expectations of grades.

Today’s featured coverage is an in-depth look at stress and cheating that comes from “Great Expectations”   by student journalists of  The Omega, at  Downers Grove North High School.  It can be found at:  The Omega

Visit us soon for more examples of work done by student journalists involved with this project.

 

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Great Expectations: Social media and self esteem

9 May

McCormick Foundation logo copy

First in a series

Schools participating in the Midwest Journalism Education Initiative’s “Collaborative Coverage” project funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation have published special reports about the “Great Expectations”  facing teens today.

The topic, jointly agreed upon by participating students and advisers, looks at a variety of issues from Expectations on Social Media, to dealing with the expectations of grades.

Today’s featured coverage is by Free Spirit Media, and can be found at:  Social Media and Self Esteem.

Visit us soon for more examples of work done by student journalists involved with this project.

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Illinois Journalism Education Association’s resolution backs advisers

15 Apr

The Illinois Journalism Education Association has adopted a resolution that not only backs the state’s media advisers, but urges administrators to stop the practice of indiscriminately reassigning or removing advisers.

The action follows several recent cases where veteran advisers have been forced out by administrators who have disagreed with student opinions or hid behind staffing numbers.

“It appears to be a case where administrators want to manipulate student media for their own goals,” Midwest Journalism Education Initiative  Director Stan Zoller said.  “We are also seeing an increase in the number of  scholastic media outlets that are facing prior restraint.”

The complete resolution can be found at:  IJEA RESOLUTION

Chicago Headline Club resolution addresses prior review

18 Feb

The Chicago Headline Club, the Chicago chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, has adopted the following resolution regarding what is in essence prior review.

The action stems from a New York Times report about members of the Obama campaign staff wanting to review reporters notes and quotes before their stories were submitted.

In light of alarming reports that journalists from some of America’s most established news organizations have allowed their sources and/or sources’ representatives to edit and/or approve quotes before publication or broadcast (see http://nyti.ms/PAy5QS), the Chicago Headline Club hereby adopts the following:

WHEREAS the practice of allowing political candidates and/or their representatives to review and/or edit quotes prior to the publication or broadcast of a report undermines the very foundation of an independent press that our predecessors so valiantly fought to obtain;

WHEREAS this practice strikes at the heart of the public’s trust in a free and unfettered press;

WHEREAS this practice in inimical to the protections and safeguards of a free society;

BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Directors of the Chicago Headline Club of the Society of Professional Journalists hereby declares that this practice must immediately cease and its future practitioners be held accountable for violating the most fundamental of journalistic standards and ethical conduct.

–CHC Board of Directors

 

“Ethics in a Digital World” set for Feb. 13

11 Feb

HOW DO YOU TRUST THE NEWS IN A DIGITAL WORLD?

A Forum on Digital Media Ethics in Journalism

7 p.m.Wed. Feb. 13, 2013

Panelists
HUGH DELLIOS, News Editor, Associated Press, Midwest Bureau
MEGHAN DOUGHERTY, Assistant Professor of Digital Communication
BASTIAAN VANACKER, Director of the Center for Digital Media Ethics & Policy
Co-Moderators
ALDEN LOURY, 
President of the Chicago Headline Club, BGA senior reporter
ASHTON MITCHELL, President of the Loyola chapter of Society of Professional Journalists

Convergence Studio
Next to SOC Lobby
SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION
820 N. MICHIGAN AVE.
WATER TOWER CAMPUS
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO
CHICAGO, IL 60611
PHONE: 312.915.6548

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This program is sponsored by the Chicago Headline Club, the Chicago chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.  For membership information, go to Headlineclub.org